Resources

Landcare Sightings: Eastern Bearded Dragon

Spotted by Victoria, one of our Project Officers, whilst putting in the leg work for Camera Trapping at Congewai. This handsome Eastern Bearded Dragon (Pogona barbata) was found up a tree, basking in the last of the afternoon sun. You can find these bearded dragons... read more

Turtle Monitoring Citizen Science

During November, the researchers at 1millionturtles.com would like everyone to be out and about near their local waterways, keeping an eye out for turtles crossing roads and helping them get to the other side safely, looking for sightings of turtles emerging to nest... read more

Shorebird Feature: Beach-nesting Birds

Nesting season has begun for our local beach-nesting birds! These shorebirds and seabirds are extremely vulnerable to disturbance from people during this time and, unfortunately, these warmer months are also when humans flock to the beaches. Disturbance during nesting... read more

Woodland Bird Feature: The Noisy Miner (a native nuisance?)

The noisy miner is one native species that has benefited greatly from human alterations to woodland and forest habitat, enabling it to increase in abundance and distribution. In short, the Noisy Miner has become an overabundant species. Why is this a problem? Large... read more

Plant of the Month: She’ll be Apples!

Within the Eucalypts and close relatives the common names of many of the groups do make a bit of sense, Ironbarks, Stringybarks, Boxes are all named for their bark, the Bloodwoods are so named for the large amount of sap they produce but what about these things called... read more

September Shorebird Feature

Some say Spring has sprung a little early this year and some flowers and birds may agree with you! Observations of Beach-stone Curlews and Far Eastern Curlews have already been reported on our shorelines from mid-August.  With the ‘official’ beginning of Spring, comes... read more

Winner of Australia’s Favourite Tree Announced

Take me to the river… “The contest is over, the dust has settled and one magnificent tree stands above the rest.  It twists and turns as it gathers water from deep underground, reaches for the sky and sends generous branches in improbable directions.  For... read more

Woodland Bird Feature: Spring is in the air – literally!

Have you noticed the warmer days already? Don’t take any notice of that thing on the wall that thinks spring starts on the 1st of September; spring is well and truly underway by then! There are (I think) at least two springs; the first being “early spring”, which... read more

Plant of the Month – Mallees

Plant of the Month: “I don’t mind at all if you call me a Mallee Boy.” The famous song by John Williamson refers to the Mallee Region of Western Victoria an area famous for it’s stunted multi-stemmed Eucalypts known as Mallees. The Mallee growth form is a fairly... read more

Plant of the Month: Not Rocky, the Bulbine Lily (Bulbine bulbosa)

Spring is just around the corner, you may not believe me but it is, and that means the wildflowers will be out soon. One of the more spectacular ones in this area (the Upper Hunter) is the Bulbine Lily (Bulbine bulbosa) a spectacular yellow lily to around 70 cm in... read more

Shorebird Article Series:

This month we defer to a wonderfully informative series of Shorebird Articles written by Neil Fraser of Tomaree Birdwatchers, published by the EcoNetwork Port Stephens. Featuring survey results, maps and handy links; this series is a must-read! Pictured: Bar-tailed... read more

Wing Threads – The Adventures of Microlight Milly

Images source: wingthreads.com Amelia Formby (AKA ‘Microlight Milly’) is now 3 weeks into her 20 000km flight around Australia, to raise awareness, educate and “to inspire action to protect the habitats of our amazing migratory shorebirds.” The project, titled ‘Wing... read more

Return of Native Flora & Fauna at Hunter River Reserve

They were heard long before they were seen – the ya-hoos and babbles of a gregarious family of Grey-Crowned Babblers (Pomatostomus temporalis subsp temporalis). The vulnerable Eastern subspecies of babbler moved through the Woodland at Hunter River Reserve,... read more

Plant of the Month: Brigalow

A dandy old horsernan is Brigalow Mick-Which his name, sir, is Michael O’Dowd -Whatever he’s riding, when timber is thick,He is always in front of the crowd.BRIGALOW MICK by Harry (“Breaker”) Morant Images from: plantnet.rbgsyd.nsw.gov.au Aside... read more

Shorebird Feature: Double-banded Plover

breeding pulmage –  image source ebird.org non-breeding plumage – image source ebird.org Charadrius bicinctus You may think that Winter isn’t a good time to spot migratory shorebirds.  It’s true, the majority of migrants have voyaged to the Northern... read more

Promote Landcare: Facebook Events

We are fortunate enough to have funding for our local groups to host workshops. While our groups may be enthusiastic about having a workshop, Landcarers don’t always have the skillset to undertake local marketing for their event. In this upcoming series, we will... read more

Woodland Birds Feature: Woodland Wander

With support from Hunter Local Land Services under the National Landcare Program, HRLN hosted a “Woodland Wander” excursion at Poppet Head Park during the April school holidays. The event was a great success, attended by almost 30 enthusiastic kids from Nulkaba OOSH’... read more

Plant of the Month: The Tale of White Beard

Common in heathlands and sandstone areas the Bearded Heaths (Leucopogon spp) look fairly unremarkable till coming into flower and fruit. The Bearded Heath gets it’s botanical Genus Leucopogon from the  Greek “Leuco-” meaning white and “pogon” meaning beard, for once... read more

What’s the difference between native, indigenous and endemic plants? And why is it important?

These terms confuse a lot of people, so let’s just take a minute to clear things up. ‘Native’ is a general term for plants that occur naturally in a country but not necessarily across the whole of that country.  ‘Indigenous’  – Indigenous species are categorised as a... read more

Death Adder Snakes

Adder, Yes, Mathematician, No. For all the time I’ve spent wandering through the bush (in thongs or even barefoot when young) I rarely see snakes, most of my encounters with them have been around areas of human activity (including a baby Brown Snake I had to catch and... read more

Plant of the Month: Big Bad Banksia Men

Big Bad Banksia Men Australian author May Gibbs cast the “Big Bad Banksia Men” as the villains of many of her stories, looking at the cones of the Old Man Banksia (Banksia serrata) it is quite easy to imagine them as heads of some creature (though I think casting them... read more